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College Track Calendar – 12th

12th Grade College Track Calendar

During your first semester you will be applying to colleges and meeting very strict deadlines. It's important to stay focused throughout the entire year. Colleges can still rescind their acceptance decision if your grades fall during second semester.

August


September


October


November


December


January


February


March


April


May


June


July

Make a serious effort to gain as much information as possible about each of the colleges on your list. Try to visit if possible. If not, take a campus tour. Be in touch via email with admissions counselors and university students at each school. Keep a file of each college on your list.


Narrow your list of colleges to approximately 5-8, and review it with the REAP counselor. Get an application and financial aid information for each college.


Ask for letters of recommendation.


Submission period for UC applicants.


Complete any last scholarship applications.


After you submit FAFSA, you should receive your student aid report (SAR) within three days to three weeks.


It is a myth that courses in the spring semester of your senior year don’t matter for college because you have already been accepted or rejected.


1-31 Notification of UC admission decisions.


If you can, visit any colleges that have invited you to enroll.


Submit any required financial deposit.


1- UC Deadline for admitted freshman to submit Statement of Intent to Register.


1 deadline for admitted freshman to submit Statement of Intent to Register.


1-31 UC submission period for applicants for winter/spring quarter.

Be in touch via email with admissions counselors and university students at each school. Keep a file of each college on your list.


Visit as many of these 5-8 colleges as possible.


Ask for letters of recommendation.


Study for the SAT and/or ACT.


UC Application period opens for fall admission of next year.


Apply to the colleges you have chosen.



Encourage your parents to file their tax returns early.


Encourage your parents to file their tax returns early.


If your performance drops off substantially, your college can cancel an offer of admission.


2 deadline for all terms to submit FAFSA and Cal Grant GPA verification form.


Review your college acceptances and compare the colleges’ financial aid packages.


Submit Statement of Intent to Register to the college you choose to attend




15 final official transcripts due at campus admissions office for all students admitted for fall.

Talk with your family about which of these 8-15 colleges is the best fit for you. Weigh the pros and cons of each school. Remember to stay true to your interests and aspirations, but also listen to advice from others.


Make a calendar for the college application process with admissions and financial aid deadlines.


Visit with your counselor and make sure you fulfilling college admission requirements.


Complete Scholarship Applications.


Complete scholarship applications.



As soon as possible after January first, complete FAFSA along with other financial aid applications your school may require.




Contact a school’s financial aid office if you have questions about the aid that school has offered you. Gettign to know your financial aid staff early is a good idea.




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College Track Calendar – 11th

11th Grade College Track Calendar

Junior year is one of the most important years in the college preparation process. You will need to register, study, and take the SATs multiple times this year.

August


September


October


November-February


March-April


May


June


July


July

Your junior year is one of the most important years in the college preparation process. It is important to get good grades during your junior year, and begin finalizing the list of colleges you will apply to.


Make a fresh list of your abilities, preferences, and personal qualities. List things you may want to study and do in college.


Sign up for the PSAT and begin PSAT test prep


If you haven’t already, sign up for the SAT and ACT.


If you haven’t already, sign up for, study, and take the SAT and ACT.


If you haven’t already, sign up for the SAT and ACT and study.


Review your REAP earnings with your family and your teachers. Discuss how you can improve your performance to earn more funding if necessary.


Review list of interests, and see if you need to add any interests or skills you have not yet listed.


Try to visit schools that interest you this summer.


Decide if you are going to apply under a particular’s school’s early action program.


Complete Scholarship Applications.

You need to put the test dates and registration deadlines for the PSAT, ACT, and SAT on your calendar, your parent’s calendars, and any additional calendars you can find.


Read about colleges and majors and their financial aid options.


Take PSAT. When taking the PSAT, sign up for Student Search Service (SSS) to get information about colleges and scholarship organizations and admissions and financial aid information.


Study for the SAT and/or ACT.


Write a resume– list your accomplishments, activities, and work experience.


Take the SAT and/or ACT (taking these tests multiple times each is recommended).


Review your list of 8-15 colleges, and spend some time reviewing your GPA and test scores to the average GPA and test scores of the admitted classes from last year at each college.


Review list of colleges, and think deeply about how they match your interests and the way of life you would like to have during college. Make any necessary adjustments.


If you plan to play Division I or II college sports and want to be eligible to be recruited by colleges, register with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Eligibility Center.

Continue to take challenging courses, striving for 3.5s and 4.0s.



Formulate a study plan for the SAT and ACT.



Write a resume– list your accomplishments, activities, and work experience. Update your information in FAFSA-4caster.ed.gov and compare the results to the actual costs of colleges to which you will apply.


Search and apply for scholarships. Some deadlines are as early as the summer between 11th and 12th grade.


Make any changes necessary to your list of 8-15 colleges to make sure it contains colleges you will have a good chance at admission, some back-up colleges, and some long-shot colleges.



If you took AP exams in May, look for your AP score report.Register for fall test dates for the SATs.


Seek out community service opportunities and extracurricular activities to get involved in during the summer. 

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College Track Calendar – 10th

10th Grade College Track Calendar

The PSAT is an important part of 10th grade. This year you will register, study, and take the PSAT. This is the practice exam before taking the real SAT the following year.

August


September


October


November


December


January


February


March


April


May


June


July

Review your schedule to make sure you are enrolled in challenging classes that will help you prepare for college.


Get involved in extracurricular activities if you have not already.


Sign up for the PSAT.


Talk to your teachers about your performance in core classes, and make sure you are doing what is required to earn 3.5s and 4.0s.


Revisit the goals you have set for yourself and assess whether or not you are on track.


Review your REAP earnings with your family and your teachers. Discuss how you can improve your performance to earn more funding, if necessary.


Join extracurricular activities if you have not already.


Review list of interests, and see if you need to add any interests or skills you have not yet listed.


Make sure you are on track to earn 3.5s and 4.0s in core classes. Seek out help if you are not.


Seek out more information about colleges that interest you through their websites, resources listed here, and leads you get from the REAP counselor.


Review your REAP earnings with your family and your teachers.


Try to make a habit of reading outside of school. This will not only help you in your classes and bring you lifelong enjoyment, but it will also help you to perform well on standardized tests.

Review your list of colleges with your LHS counselor and the REAP counselor. Talk with them about whether they think these colleges are the right fit, and whether you are on track to be admitted.



Begin PSAT test prep.


If you are falling off track, schedule a time with your teacher to make a plan to get caught up.


Are you meeting eligibility requirements of colleges on your list?


Calculate how much additional REAP funding you will earn for the rest of the year and in total. Take enough challenging classes that are REAP eligible.



Review list of colleges, and think deeply about how they match your interests and the way of life you would like to have during college. Make any necessary adjustments.



If you have the opportunity to visit a college, take it.


Discuss how you can improve your performance to earn more funding if necessary.


Seek out community service opportunities and extracurricular activities to get involved in during the summer. Look for a job related to a field that interests you, even if it is just sweeping their floors.

Spend some time looking through college websites and software that helps match you to potential colleges to make sure you include a wide array of possibilities on your college list. Remember, many students get more aid for more expensive colleges, so cost is not always a factor.



Take PSAT.



If you have concerns or want to talk about your academic performance, schedule an appointment to meet with your REAP counselor.


Learn the difference between grants, loans, work study, and colleges. Make a plan of where you will get the additional funding necessary







Review your scores in high school core classes so far. Think deeply about what you will need to do next year to improve or keep up the good scores. Junior year is considered the most important year to most colleges. You will need to take your classes seriously and do your best.

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College Track Calendar – 9th

9th Grade College Track Calendar

During 9th grade we begin providing a more concrete month-to-month schedule for all students. It is important to stay on schedule to prepare for the more important deadlines that appear during 11th grade.

August


September


October


November


December


January


February


March


April


May


June


July

Meet with your counselor to discuss your college plans. Make sure you are taking challenging classes that will help you prepare for college. Colleges prefer four years of English, as well as history, math, science, and foreign language.


Make a list of your skills and interests by thinking hard about what you enjoy and what you38 are good at. Begin the career exploration brainstorming process.


Browse college handbooks, guides, and websites, and begin making a list of colleges that interest you. Check out different majors and strengths of various universities. Note college admission requirements, and add them to the goals you have set for yourself.


Check in with your teachers of core classes about how you are doing. Explain that you are a REAP student, and it is really important to you that you earn a 3.5 or 4.0 in their class.


Assess your study habits after your first semester of high school. Are t hey working? Do they need to be adjusted?


Review your REAP earnings after first semester. Discuss with your family and with the REAP counselor what you could have done to earn more funding, and make a plan to improve performance in the new semester.


Spend some more time reviewing college options, and expand your list of possible colleges. Talk to the REAP counselor about how to find out more about colleges that interest you.


Find extracurricular activities to get involved in if you have not already. Talk to the REAP counselor if you cannot think of any.


Begin exploring financial aid websites and scholarships that are available. Review the applications they require, and begin getting an idea of what will be required of you when the time comes to apply for this aid.


Check in with your teachers in core classes about your performance. Ask if you are on track to receive a 3.5 or 4.0. If you are not on track, schedule a time with your teacher to formulate a plan about how you can improve your performance.


Review your REAP earnings with your family. Discuss what you need to do next year to keep up the good work, or begin improving academic performance to earn more funding.


Seek out community service opportunities and extracurricular activities to get involved in during the summer. Look for a job related to a field that interests you, even if it is just sweeping their floors.

Get involved in extracurricular activities.


Find out more about the fields that interest you, and what education is required to get a job in those fields, what kind of salary you will earn, what the working conditions will be like, what the future outlook is of careers in this field, etc


Find out more about the fields that interest you, and what education is required to get a job in those fields, what kind of salary you will earn, what the working conditions will be like, what the future outlook is of careers in this field, etc.


If you are not on-track to earn these scores, ask your teachers what you can do to improve your performance.


If you are not earning 3.5s and 4.0s in your core classes schedule meetings with individual teachers and the REAP counselor to discuss what you need to do to improve your academic performance.


Check the goals you set first semester. Are you on track? If you have fallen behind, be proactive in scheduling meetings with your teachers and counselors to make a plan to get back on track.


Spend some more time reviewing potential careers. Look at your list of interests and skills. Is there anything you can add to it? Can you think of any extracurricular activities, clubs, or jobs that are related to this interest that you can participate in?




Make a plan. What will you do if you feel yourself falling behind in your classes? What resources can you use to keep yourself on track? Talk to the REAP counselor to help formulate a plan to stay on track toward achieving your goals



Try to begin reading outside of school. This will not only help you in your classes and bring you lifelong enjoyment, but it will also help you to perform well on standardized tests.


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College Track Calendar – 8th

8th Grade College Track Calendar

This year is when REAP financial planning begins for the next four year. Start paying attention to what you like to do during your spare time. This will help when looking for extracurricular activities to place on your college application.

Fall


Make a plan to keep good study habits and do well in all of our courses.


Aim for 3.5 and 4.0s in ALL of your core classes. This will not only earn you REAP funds, but it will prepare you for what you need to do in high school to be admitted into the college of your choice.


What you do now is setting the stage for how you will perform in high school. It is important that you do your best and take your classes seriously.


Use this year to find extracurricular activities to get involved in both inside and outside of school. It is important to try to become a community-minded person.

Winter


Check in with your teacher and your family about your academic performance first semester and review the REAP funds you have earned.


Discuss how you could have earned more REAP funds, or if you earned the maximum, discuss opportunities to take your skills and interests further.

Spring


Check in with your teacher about how you have been performing in class. Explain that you want to go to college, and seek out advice about how to form good study habits to keep on the college track.


Take advantage of your last opportunities as a middle school student to get involved in extracurricular activities. Join a club, find a cause, try to find organizations that match up with your interests.

Summer


Review your REAP earnings with your family. Discuss what you need to do next year to keep up the good work, or begin improving academic performance to earn more funding.


Find extracurricular activities to get involved in that have to do with your interests. Try to find opportunities to volunteer or offer community service.


Try to begin reading outside of school. This will not only help you in your classes and bring you lifelong enjoyment, but it will also help you to perform well on standardized tests.


Try to find current Lindsay High School students to talk to about what to expect in high school.


Look into A-G course requirements, and begin thinking about what types of courses you will need to take in high school to stay on the college track.


Look ahead into how much REAP funding you can earn over the next four years. Begin planning for college now.

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College Track Calendar – 7th

7th Grade College Track Calendar

REAP recommends to begin thinking about college during 7th grade. It is important to begin a routine with parents of looking into class schedules and learning to speak to counselors about college plans.

Fall


Take challenging classes, and strive for 3.5s and 4.0s. Take your middle school courses seriously. This is the time to begin forming habits that will keep you on the college track.

Winter


Consider which classes were your best in your first semester of middle school. Consider which classes you could use improvement in.


Talk to your teacher and tell him or her that you are interested in going to college. Get help with classes you need improvement in.


Ask your teacher if there are any extra curricular activities you can participate in that will add to your interests and skills.


Review the earnings you received first semester. Discuss with your teacher and your family what you need to do to earn more funding next semester, or what you have been doing that has helped you succeed and begin building your college fund.

Spring


Check in again with your teacher. Have you done what you need to improve in classes that were giving you trouble? Have you found any ways to take your skills or interests further outside of school?


Discuss staying on the college track with your teacher.


Discuss the college track with your family.


Talk with your teacher and family about making an appointment to talk with the REAP counselor if you have any confusion about our program or what you need to be doing to stay on the college track.

Summer


Review your REAP earnings with your family. Discuss what you need to do next year to keep up the good work, or begin improving academic performance to earn more funding.


Find extracurricular activities to get involved in that have to do with your interests. Try to find opportunities to volunteer or offer community service.


Try to begin reading outside of school. This will not only help you in your classes and bring you lifelong enjoyment, but it will also help you to perform well on standardized tests.

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Extracurriculars

Extracurriculars

Encourage your student to find something he or she likes doing outside of class, and dive into it. Colleges want to see that students are following and actively pursuing their passions. Encourage your student to find a club, sport, extracurricular activity, volunteer opportunity, or job that will help show colleges that he or she has the ability to make a commitment to something and follow through with it.

Commitment

Colleges are not necessarily looking for students who do everything. They are looking for students who make a commitment to an interest or passion outside of academics. Help your student think about depth rather than breadth. 

Apply Knowledge

Work experience can help your student identify career interests and goals, gain skills, and apply classroom knowledge to the real world. Encourage your student to look for a job in a field that interests them.

Workforce

Encourage your student to shadow someone in the workforce in a field of interest. Contact the REAP counselor for more information on how to facilitate job-shadowing.

Community

Volunteer work such as tutoring, mentoring or community service is a good way for your student to gain experience and show colleges that he or she care about the community.

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Set High Academic Goals

Set High Academic Goals

Setting academic goals is more than shooting for a high GPA. As a REAP student, you also need to be focusing on your financial goals, your class schedule goals, and looking into career paths.

Make a REAP Plan

Sit down with your student and make a list of which REAP eligible classes he or she plans to take, adding up total possible earnings. Help your student make a goal of how many of these classes he or she will be able to maintain at least a 3.5 in, and check in periodically on that goal.

Career & College Paths

Encourage your student to consider many different career paths, and many different four-year universities. It is important that he or she seeks out information about the wide array of options available, and looks into education requirements of different careers and admissions requirements of different colleges.

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REAP Goals & Funding

You should be receiving academic progress reports from Lindsay High School by mail every six weeks. This is a good time to check in with your student about their REAP goals, and discuss whether or not they are on track to earn REAP funding as planned.

GPA, SAT/ACT Scores

After your student gathers information about different colleges, help him or her write a list of colleges of interest, as well as admissions requirements at each school. Encourage your student to talk to the REAP counselor about how to find out what GPA and SAT/ACT scores colleges on the list require for admittance.

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A-G Requirements

A-G Requirements

Most colleges require students to take all of the classes listed in the chart below. The academic rigor of the courses your student takes is an important factor in the college admission process.

A


B


C


D


E


F


G


US History and Social Science


English


Mathematics (Algebra I, Geometry, and Intermediate Algebra)


Science with laboratory (1 year Biological and 1 year Physical)


Language other than English (the same language)


Visual and Performing Arts (Art, Dance, Theater/Drama, or Music)


An additional year chosen from the a-g list


Total Number of Courses Required


2


4


3


2


2


1


1


15


AP Classes

Advanced Placement (AP) credits help your student stand out in the admissions process. More competitive schools expect that students have taken many of AP classes that are offered. AP also gives your student the opportunity to earn college credit now, free of charge.

Challenge and Improvement

It is OK to start with the basics. Once your student builds proficiency in those courses, he or she can set goals to move on to advanced classes. Colleges like to see improvement, and applicants who continuously challenge themselves and grow.

Foreign Language

Many colleges require at least two years of foreign language, and many prefer more.

Arts

Many colleges recommend one or two semesters in the arts.

For More Information

Contact REAP Club Advisor

(559) 562-5911

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Eligible Courses

Eligible Courses

REAP offers a recommended competitive schedule for students that parallels the standards of the University of California system. Taking these courses guarantees that your application will make it to the desk of a college admissions officer.

ENGLISH


AP English Language


AP English Literature


English 10H


English 10P


English 11P


English 12P


English 9H


English 9P


MATCH


Algebra 1P


Algebra 2H


Algebra 2P


Algebra B


AP Calculus AB


Geometry H


Geometry P


Trigonometry / Math Analysis


SCIENCE


Ag Biology


AP Biology


Chemistry P


Earth Sciences


Physics P


Physiology P


HISTORY/SOCIAL STUDIES


AP US Government & Politics


AP US History


Government H


Government P


US History H


US History P


World History H


World History P


FOREIGN LANGUAGE


AP French


AP Spanish Language


AP Spanish Literature


French 1P


French 2P


French 3P


Spanish Speakers 1P


Spanish Speakers 2P


Spanish 1P


Spanish 2P


Spanish 3P