Student Resources

Why go to college?
There are many ways that a college education will add knowledge, skills, and opportunity to your life. In college, you will gain practical skills, experiences, and new ways of thinking that you will use for the rest of your life no matter which career you choose.

Check out the benefits of a college degree
  • Higher Salary – Review the chart to the right. College graduates earn an average of $1 million more than high school graduates over their lifetime.
  • Job Security – There are far more jobs available for educated people. The more education you have, the more likely you will always have a job.
  • Quality Job Opportunities – Today, most good jobs require a college education, much more so than in the past. Modern businesses want to hire people who have gone through college and demonstrated they know how to think and solve problems. A college degree will help you to be more selective in choosing the type of work you want to spend your time doing.
  • It opens doors – College provides the opportunity to meet other motivated, smart and success-oriented people. It exposes you to new opportunities and experiences, and gives you the chance to explore your interests and think deeply about the meaning of your life and what you will contribute to the world.
  • Why attend now? – Many students who do not enter college directly after high school never get around to it. In fact, even a large percentage of high school graduates who begin their education at a two-year community college do not transfer to finish their four-year degree. Don’t put off college. Take advantage of the help REAP offers in navigating the pathway to college and making a financial aid plan to fund college.
Stay on the college track
Get the facts
  • Find out about college admission, academics and campus life by asking someone who has experienced it such as students from your high school who are now in college. If you do not know how to get in contact with anyone in college, talk to the REAP counselor to help connect you to a university student.
  • Get to know your counselors, especially the REAP counselor. They will guide you in gathering important information that will help you set goals for college admission, and learn about colleges and careers that may fit your interests.
  • Research careers that interest you, and try to talk to people who work in fields that interest you. Research colleges that are strong in these fields.
  • Keep a list of colleges that interest you along with their admissions requirements in a folder so you can monitor your progress toward being eligible for admission at the colleges you choose. This is a good way of setting goals for your academic performance in high school.
  • Make a list of all the REAP eligible classes you will take, and calculate your total earnings at high school graduation. Look through the financial aid resources on this page and make an appointment with the REAP counselor to learn about how you will secure the additional funding to finance your college career.
  • Attend college fairs online at College Week Live.
Review Admission Requirements
  • For UC and CSU campuses as well as most private colleges, you must take all of the classes from the A-G list to be eligible for admission.
  • You should take recommended classes in addition to required classes. For example, many schools only require two years of foreign language, but prefer three. You will have a better chance of being admitted if you take three years of foreign language.
  • Your college application GPA will be calculated using only courses that are on this list.
  • For CSU campuses, 9th grade scores are not included in your GPA, so if you had a slow start, there is time for improvement.
AreaSubjectYears
A.US History and Social Science2
B.English4
C.Mathematics (Algebra I, Geometry, and Intermediate Algebra)
3
D.Science with laboratory (1 year
Biological and 1 year Physical)
2
E.Language other than English
(the same language)
2
F.Visual and Performing Arts (Art, Dance, Theater/Drama, or Music)
1
G.An additional year chosen from the a-g list
1
Total Required Subject Units15
Additional Requirements and Special Offers
  • CSU requires either ACT or SAT scores unless you have above a 3.0 grade point average and are a California resident.
  • UC requires that you receive the equivalent to a C or better in all of your classes to be eligible for admission.
  • UC requires ACT or SAT scores.
  • If you’re a California state resident who has met UC eligibility requirements and aren’t admitted to any UC campuses to which you apply, you are guaranteed a spot at one of the UC campuses provided that you rank in the top 9% of California state high school students according to your admissions index, or you rank in the top 9% of your graduating class.
Learn More
Set Goals
  • Review your list of colleges and their admissions requirements. Write out the classes you plan to take each year, and what scores you will need to be admitted to the colleges of your choice. Calculate your potential REAP earnings based on this list.
  • Look for adults who can help you succeed at your goals. If you’re interested in a particular subject or activity, talk to a teacher or counselor who knows about it. If you need help in a particular subject, be sure to ask for it.
Select the right high school courses
  • Take at least five solid academic courses every semester. This will also provide plenty of opportunities to earn REAP rewards and grow your college fund, and colleges will know that you are capable of carrying a heavy load.
  • Take challenging courses. The academic rigor of your courses is an important factor in the college admission process.
  • AP credits will help you stand out in the admissions process. More competitive schools will expect that you taken a majority of AP classes available at your school. AP gives you the opportunity to earn college credit now, free of charge. Once you attend a university, each credit will cost a significant amount of money. Take advantage of the opportunity to save money and enter college ahead of the game.
  • It is OK to start with the basics. Once you build proficiency in those courses, you can set goals to move on to advanced classes. Colleges like to see improvement, and applicants who continuously challenge themselves and grow.
  • You need to take English every year.
  • You need to take algebra and geometry to succeed on college entrance exams. You should take these courses as early on as possible.
  • Enroll in advanced science and math to show colleges you are ready for higher-level work. Most colleges look for students who have taken at least three years of math in high school. More competitive colleges look for students who have taken four years of math. Colleges want to see that you have taken at least three years of laboratory science classes. More competitive schools expect that you take four years of lab science classes.
  • Take at least two and a half years of social studies. You need to take two semesters of US history, one semester of US government, one semester of either world history or geography, and an additional semester of social studies.
  • Take at least two years of foreign language. Most colleges require at least two years of foreign language, but many prefer more. Stand out by taking three or four years of foreign language.
  • Take classes in the arts. Many colleges recommend one or two semesters in the arts.
Form good study habits now
  • Organization is the key to success. Keep an organized binder and backpack. Always know where to find important documents. Keep a calendar of important dates and check it every day.
  • Find a quiet place to do your work, and try to do all your homework right when you go home. Always complete work on time.
  • Plan ahead. Successful people can chip away at a large goal by planning how to complete multiple phases of work. Colleges are looking to see that you have the maturity to take on and complete challenging tasks and plan your time so you can complete them successfully.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask for organizational help. Now is the time to form good habits. Your teachers and counselors would be more than happy to help formulate a plan with you.
Get involved
  • Find something you really like doing and dive into it. Colleges want to see that you are following and actively pursuing your passions. Find a club, sport, extra curricular activity, volunteer opportunity, or job that will help you develop skills and show colleges you can make a commitment and stick with it.
  • The activities you are involved in can show a great deal about you that your grades cannot. They can demonstrate your interests, and show that you are able to make a meaningful contribution to something larger than yourself, make a long-term commitment, and properly manage your priorities and time. Colleges are looking for students who stand out as interesting individuals. Interesting individuals spend their time doing interesting things.
  • Colleges are not necessarily looking for students who do everything. They are looking for students who make a commitment to an interest or passion outside of academics. Think about depth rather than breadth.
  • Work experience can help you identify career interests and goals, gain skills, and apply classroom knowledge to the real world. Think about finding any job you can at an organization that is in a field that interests you.
  • Consider arranging to shadow someone in their workplace. Talk to the REAP counselor about helping you facilitate this arrangement.
  • Volunteer work such as tutoring or mentoring or community service is a good way to gain experience and show colleges that you care about your community.
Study for and take standardized tests

Your performance on standardized tests is an important factor in college admissions. It is important that you study for required standardized tests. We recommend that you take the ACT and SAT multiple times so that you can use your highest score in the admissions process. Contact the REAP counselor to learn how to apply for fee waivers.

California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE)
  • REAP offers $250 for passing the English section of the CAHSEE on your first attempt, and $250 for passing the Math section of the CAHSEE on your first attempt. Taking this test seriously could help you earn $500 toward college.
  • Prepare by taking a timed Math Practice Test and an English Practice Test.
  • Prepare by watching CAHSEE videos at Khan Academy.
Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT)
  • The PSAT/NMSQT® is not an admission test, but it’s good practice for the SAT and, if you take it in your junior year, it can help you qualify for a scholarship. Talk to your LHS or REAP counselor about signing up.
  • Prepare by using College Board PSAT Test Prep.
Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT)
  • The SAT was designed to measure your readiness for college.
  • All four year universities and colleges in the United States accept the SAT.
  • REAP recommends that you take the SAT or ACT three times before you apply to college.
  • Be sure to apply for application fee waivers. Students eligible for the waiver can take the SAT up to three times free of charge.
  • Get test dates and register online.
  • Prepare by using College Board Practice.
  • Prepare by watching SAT videos at Khan Academy.
  • Put aside time to take timed, practice tests online. Review the results and spend time working on areas that need improvement.
American College Testing (ACT)
  • The ACT was designed to measure your readiness for college. It provides an alternative to the SAT.
  • All four-year colleges accept the ACT.
  • REAP recommends that you take either the ACT of SAT three times before you apply to college.
  • Get test dates and register online.
  • Be sure to apply for the ACT fee waiver. Learn how to apply here.
  • Prepare using ACT online resources.
  • Review ACT sample tests.
Follow the College Track Calendar
Middle School
7th Grade
Fall

  • Take challenging classes, and strive for 3.5s and 4.0s. Take your middle school courses seriously. This is the time to begin forming habits that will keep you on the college track.

Winter

  • Think about your interests and skills.
  • Consider which classes were your best in the first semester of middle school. Consider which classes you could improve in.
  • Inform your teacher that you are interested in going to college. Ask your teacher what you should be doing now to prepare.
  • Ask your teacher if there are any extra curricular activities you can participate in that will add to your interests and skills.
  • Review the earnings you received first semester. Discuss with your teacher and your family what you need to do to earn more funding next semester, or what you have been doing that has helped you succeed and begin building your college fund.

Spring

  • Check in again with your teacher. Have you done what you need to improve in classes that were giving you trouble? Have you found any ways to take your skills or interests further outside of school?
  • Discuss staying on the college track with your teacher.
  • Discuss the college track with your family.
  • Talk with your teacher and family about making an appointment to talk with the REAP counselor if you have any confusion about our program or what you need to be doing to stay on the college track.

Summer

  • Review your REAP earnings with your family. Discuss what you need to do next year to keep up the good work, or begin improving academic performance to earn more funding.
  • Find extracurricular activities to get involved in that have to do with your interests. Try to find opportunities to volunteer or offer community service.
  • Try to begin making a habit of reading outside of school. This will not only help you in your classes and bring you lifelong enjoyment, but it will also help you to perform well on standardized tests.
8th Grade
Fall

  • Make a plan to keep good study habits and do well in all of our courses.
  • Aim for 3.5s and 4.0s in ALL of your core classes. This will not only help you grow your REAP account, but it will prepare you for what you need to do in high school to be admitted into the college of your choice.
  • What you do now is setting the stage for how you will perform in high school. It is important that you do your best and take your classes seriously.
  • Use this year to find extracurricular activities to get involved in both inside and outside of school. It is important to try to become a community-minded person.

Winter

  • Check in with your teacher and your family about your academic performance first semester and review the REAP funds you have earned.
  • Discuss how you could have earned more REAP funds, or if you earned the maximum, discuss opportunities to take your skills and interests further.

Spring

  • Check in with your teacher about how you have been performing in class. Explain that you want to go to college, and seek out advice about how to form good study habits to keep on the college track.
  • Take advantage of your last opportunities as a middle school student to get involved in extracurricular activities. Join a club, find a cause, and try to find organizations that match up with your interests.

Summer

  • Review your REAP earnings with your family. Discuss what you need to do next year to keep up the good work, or begin improving academic performance to earn more funding.
  • Find extracurricular activities to get involved in that have to do with your interests. Try to find opportunities to volunteer or offer community service.
  • Try to make a habit of reading outside of school. This will not only help you in your classes and bring you lifelong enjoyment, but it will also help you to perform well on standardized tests.
  • Discuss what sort of extracurricular activities, clubs, and or sports you would like to participate in next year with your friends and family.
  • Try to find current Lindsay High School students to talk to about what to expect in high school.
  • Look into A-G course requirements, and begin thinking about what types of courses you will need to take in high school to stay on the college track.
  • Look ahead into how much REAP funding you can earn over the next four years. Begin planning for college now.
High School
9th Grade
Aug

  • Meet with your counselor to discuss your college plans. Make sure you are taking challenging classes that will help you prepare for college. Colleges prefer four years of English, as well as history, math, science, and foreign language.
  • Get involved in extracurricular activities.

Sept

  • Make a list of your skills and interests by thinking hard about what you enjoy and what you are good at. Begin the career exploration brainstorming process.
  • Find out more about the fields that interest you, and what education is required to get a job in those fields, what kind of salary you will earn, what the working conditions will be like, what the future outlook is of careers in this field, etc.
  • Make a list of possible jobs that can be matched to your skills and interests.
  • Set your goals. Know what will be expected of you in high school to be admitted to a college that will help you attain your goals, and keep your eye on the prize.
  • Make a plan. What will you do if you feel yourself falling behind in your classes? What resources can you use to keep yourself on track? Talk to the REAP counselor to help formulate a plan to stay on track toward achieving your goals.

Oct

  • Browse college handbooks, guides, and websites, and begin making a list of colleges that interest you. Check out different majors and strengths of various universities. Note college admission requirements, and add them to the goals you have set for yourself.
  • Seek out more information about these colleges.

Nov

  • Check in with your teachers of core classes about how you are doing. Explain that you are a REAP student, and it is really important to you that you earn a 3.5 or 4.0 in their class. If you are not on-track to earn these scores, ask your teachers what you can do to improve your performance.
  • Find extracurricular activities to get involved in if you have not already.

Dec

  • Assess your study habits after your first semester of high school. Are they working? Do they need to be adjusted? If you are not earning 3.5s and 4.0s in your core classes schedule meetings with individual teachers and the REAP counselor to discuss what you need to do to improve your academic performance.

Jan

  • Review your REAP earnings after first semester. Discuss with your family and with the REAP counselor what you could have done to earn more funding, and make a plan to improve performance in the new semester.Check the goals you set first semester. Are you on track? If you have fallen behind, be proactive in scheduling meetings with your teachers and counselors to make a plan to get back on track.

Feb

  • Spend some more time reviewing college options, and expand your list of possible colleges. Talk to the REAP counselor about how to find out more about colleges that interest you.
  • Spend some more time reviewing potential careers. Look at your list of interests and skills. Is there anything you can add to it? Can you think of any extracurricular activities, clubs, or jobs that are related to this interest that you can participate in?

Mar

  • Find extracurricular activities to get involved in if you have not already. Talk to the REAP counselor if you cannot think of any.

April

  • Begin exploring financial aid websites and scholarships that are available. Review the applications they require, and begin getting an idea of what will be required of you when the time comes to apply for this aid.

May

  • Check in with your teachers in core classes about your performance. Ask if you are on track to receive a 3.5 or 4.0. If you are not on track, schedule a time with your teacher to formulate a plan about how you can improve your performance.

June

  • Review your REAP earnings with your family. Discuss what you need to do next year to keep up the good work, or begin improving academic performance to earn more funding.

July

  • Seek out community service opportunities and extracurricular activities to get involved in during the summer. Colleges are looking for applicants who stand out and show that they have pursued their interests and strengths outside of school. Look for a job related to a field that interests you, even if it is just sweeping their floors.
  • Try to make a habit of reading outside of school. This will not only help you in your classes and bring you lifelong enjoyment, but it will also help you to perform well on standardized tests.
10th grade
Aug

  • Review your schedule to make sure you are enrolled in challenging classes that will help you prepare for college.
  • Review your list of colleges with your LHS counselor and the REAP counselor. Talk with them about whether they think these colleges are the right fit, and whether you are on track to be admitted.
  • Spend some time looking through books listing all colleges, college websites, and software that helps match you to potential colleges to make sure you include a wide array of possibilities on your college list. Remember, many students get more aid for more expensive colleges, so cost is not always a factor.

Sept

  • Get involved in extracurricular activities if you have not already.

Oct

  • Sign up for the PSAT.
  • Begin PSAT test prep.
  • Take the PSAT.

Nov

  • Talk to your teachers about your performance in core classes, and make sure you are doing what is required to earn 3.5s and 4.0s. If you are falling off track, schedule a time with your teacher to make a plan to get caught up.

Dec

  • Revisit the goals you have set for yourself and assess whether or not you are on track. Are you meeting eligibility requirements of colleges on your list? If you have concerns or want to talk about your academic performance, schedule an appointment to meet with your REAP counselor.

Jan

  • Review your REAP earnings with your family and your teachers. Discuss how you can improve your performance to earn more funding, if necessary.
  • Calculate how much additional REAP funding you will be able to earn for the rest of the year and in total. Make sure you are taking enough challenging classes that are REAP eligible.
  • Learn the difference between grants, loans, work study, and colleges.
  • Review your REAP funds and estimate how much additional REAP funding you will earn throughout high school.
  • Make a plan of where you will get the additional funding necessary to pay for college. Review grants, scholarships and loans, and see what is required in the application process.

Feb

  • Join extracurricular activities if you have not already.

Mar

  • Review list of interests, and see if you need to add any interests or skills you have not yet listed.
  • Review list of colleges, and think deeply about how they match your interests and the way of life you would like to have during college. Make any necessary adjustments.

April

  • Make sure you are on track to earn 3.5s and 4.0s in core classes. Seek out help if you are not.

May

  • Seek out more information about colleges that interest you through their websites, resources listed here, and leads you get from the REAP counselor.
  • If you have the opportunity to visit a college, take it.

June

  • Review your REAP earnings with your family and your teachers. Discuss how you can improve your performance to earn more funding if necessary.

July

  • Try to make a habit of reading outside of school. This will not only help you in your classes and bring you lifelong enjoyment, but it will also help you to perform well on standardized tests.
  • Seek out community service opportunities and extracurricular activities to get involved in during the summer. Colleges are looking for applicants who stand out and show that they have pursued their interests and strengths outside of school. Look for a job related to a field that interests you, even if it is just sweeping their floors.
  • Review your scores in high school core classes so far. Think deeply about what you will need to do next year to improve or keep up the good scores. Junior year is considered the most important year to most colleges. You will need to take your classes seriously and do your best.
11th grade
Aug.

  • Your junior year is one of the most important years in the college preparation process. It is important to get good grades during your junior year, and begin finalizing the list of colleges you will apply to.
  • You need to put the test dates and registration deadlines for the PSAT, ACT, and SAT on your calendar, your parent’s calendars, and any additional calendars you can find.
  • Continue to take challenging courses, striving for 3.5s and 4.0s.

Sept.

  • Make a fresh list of your abilities, preferences, and personal qualities. List things you may want to study and do in college.
  • Read about colleges and majors.
  • Review financial aid options.
  • Create a more serious list of college interests, including 8-15 colleges that fit your interests and that you will be able to meet admittance requirements. Review this list with the REAP counselor, making sure it is based on facts.

Oct

  • Sign up for the PSAT.
  • Begin PSAT test prep.
  • Take the PSAT/NMSQT.
  • When taking the PSAT, sign up for Student Search Service (SSS) to get information about colleges and scholarship organizations and admissions and financial aid information. Colleges use SSS as a primary way to seek out students who are a good fit for their schools.
  • Formulate a study plan for the SAT and ACT.

Nov

  • If you haven’t already, sign up for the SAT and ACT.
  • Study for the SAT and/or ACT.

Dec

  • If you haven’t already, sign up for the SAT and ACT.
  • Study for the SAT and/or ACT.
  • Take the SAT and/or ACT (taking these tests multiple times each is recommended).

Jan

  • If you haven’t already, sign up for the SAT and ACT.
  • Study for the SAT and/or ACT.
  • Take the SAT and/or ACT (taking these tests multiple times each is recommended).

Feb

  • If you haven’t already, sign up for the SAT and ACT.
  • Study for the SAT and/or ACT.
  • Take the SAT and/or ACT (taking these tests multiple times each is recommended).

Mar

  • If you haven’t already, sign up for the SAT and ACT.
  • Study for the SAT and/or ACT.
  • Take the SAT and/or ACT (taking these tests multiple times each is recommended).
  • Search and apply for scholarships. Some deadlines are as early as the summer between 11th and 12th grade.

April

  • If you haven’t already, sign up for the SAT and ACT.
  • Study for the SAT and/or ACT.
  • Take the SAT and/or ACT (taking these tests multiple times each is recommended).
  • Search and apply for scholarships. Some deadlines are as early as the summer between 11th and 12th grade.

May

  • If you haven’t already, sign up for the SAT and ACT.
  • Study for the SAT and/or ACT.
  • Take the SAT and/or ACT (taking these tests multiple times each is recommended).
  • Search and apply for scholarships. Some deadlines are as early as the summer between 11th and 12th grade.
  • Write a resume– list your accomplishments, activities, and work experience.
  • Begin making a financial plan to fund college. Create a worksheet with costs and add up your funding options. Consult with the REAP counselor for help.
  • Update your information in FAFSA-4caster.ed.gov and compare the results to the actual costs of colleges to which you will apply.

June

  • Review your REAP earnings with your family and your teachers. Discuss how you can improve your performance to earn more funding if necessary.
  • Review your list of 8-15 colleges, and spend some time reviewing your GPA and test scores to the average GPA and test scores of the admitted classes from last year at each college. Make any changes necessary to your list of 8-15 colleges to make sure it contains colleges you will have a good chance at admission, some back-up colleges, and some long-shot colleges. You don’t need to remove the college of your dreams because your GPA is a little lower than their average, but you do need to make sure that you leave yourself plenty of options.

July

  • Try to visit schools that interest you this summer.
  • If you plan to play Division I or II college sports and want to be eligible to be recruited by colleges, register with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Eligibility Center.
  • If you took AP exams in May, look for your AP score report.
  • Register for fall test dates for the SATs.
  • Decide if you are going to apply under a particular’s school’s early action program.
  • Complete Scholarship Applications.
  • Try to make a habit of reading outside of school. This will not only help you in your classes and bring you lifelong enjoyment, but it will also help you to perform well on standardized tests.
  • Seek out community service opportunities and extracurricular activities to get involved in during the summer. Colleges are looking for applicants who stand out and show that they have pursued their interests and strengths outside of school. Look for a job related to a field that interests you, even if it is just sweeping their floors.
12th grade
Aug

  • Make a serious effort to gain as much information as possible about each of the colleges on your list. Try to visit if possible. If not, take a campus tour. Be in touch via email with admissions counselors and university students at each school. Keep a file of each college on your list.
  • Talk with your family about which of these 8-15 colleges is the best fit for you. Weigh the pros and cons of each school. Remember to stay true to your interests and aspirations, but also listen to advice from others.

Sept

  • Narrow your list of colleges to approximately 5-8, and review it with the REAP counselor. Get an application and financial aid information for each college.
  • Visit as many of these 5-8 colleges as possible.
  • Make a calendar for the college application process with admissions and financial aid deadlines.
  • Ask for letters of recommendation.
  • Visit with your counselor and make sure you fulfilling college admission requirements.
  • Complete Scholarship Applications.

Oct

  • Ask for letters of recommendation.
  • UC Application period opens for fall admission of next year.
  • Get transcripts sent to the schools you will be applying to.
  • Complete Scholarship Applications.

Nov

  • Submission period for UC applicants.
  • Apply to the colleges you have chosen.
  • Complete scholarship applications.

Dec

  • Complete any last scholarship applications.

Jan

  • Filing period for FAFSA and Cal Grant Verification Form opens (filing period is open through March 2nd).
  • Encourage your parents to file their tax returns early.
  • As soon as possible after January first, complete FAFSA along with other financial aid applications your school may require.
  • After you submit FAFSA, you should receive your student aid report (SAR) within three days to three weeks.
  • Complete any last scholarship applications.

Feb

  • It is a myth that courses in the spring semester of your senior year don’t matter for college because you have already been accepted or rejected. If your performance drops off substantially, your college can cancel an offer of admission.

March

  • 1-31 Notification of UC admission decisions.
  • 2 deadline for all terms to submit FAFSA and Cal Grant GPA verification form.

April

  • If you can, visit any colleges that have invited you to enroll.
  • Review your college acceptances and compare the colleges’ financial aid packages.
  • Contact a school’s financial aid office if you have questions about the aid that school has offered you. Gettign to know your financial aid staff early is a good idea.
  • Submit any required financial deposit.
  • Submit Statement of Intent to Register to the college you choose to attend.

May

  • 1- UC Deadline for admitted freshman to submit Statement of Intent to Register.

June

  • 1 deadline for admitted freshman to submit Statement of Intent to Register.

July

  • 1-31 UC submission period for applicants for winter/spring quarter.
  • 15 final official transcripts due at campus admissions office for all students admitted for fall.
Find a career path that fits you

The earlier you start thinking about your interests and skills and how they fit into various fields and career paths, the easier it will be to make decisions later on. We encourage you to follow your passions. Most people spend the majority of their time working. It is important that you enjoy and feel fulfilled by what you do. It is also important that you have an idea of what kind of salary you can earn, and what kind of job availability there is in the field of your interest. Having a general idea of what careers interest you will help you pick college and major as well.

Review online resources
Find a college that fits you
Review admissions requirements

For UC and CSU campuses as well as most private colleges, you must take all of the classes from the A-G list to be eligible for admission. Your college application GPA will be calculated using only courses that are on this list. For CSU campuses, 9th grade scores are not included in your GPA, so if you had a slow start, there is time for improvement.

A-G Requirements
AreaSubjectYears
A.US History and Social Science2
B.English4
C.Mathematics (Algebra I, Geometry, and Intermediate Algebra)
3
D.Science with laboratory (1 year
Biological and 1 year Physical)
2
E.Language other than English
(the same language)
2
F.Visual and Performing Arts (Art, Dance, Theater/Drama, or Music)
1
G.An additional year chosen from the a-g list
1
Total Required Subject Units15
  • CSU requires either ACT or SAT scores unless you have above a 3.0 grade point average and are a California resident.
  • UC requires that you receive the equivalent to a C or better in all of your classes to be eligible for admission.
  • UC requires ACT or SAT scores.
  • UC requires a personal statement. CSU does not.
  • If you’re a California state resident who has met UC eligibility requirements and aren’t admitted to any UC campuses to which you apply, you’ll be offered a spot at another campus is space is available provided that you rank in the top 9% of California state high school students according to your admisisons index, or you rank in the top 9% of your graduating class.
Learn about many different schools
  • It is important that you expose yourself to a wide array of colleges when considering which is best for you. The sky is the limit, and often financial aid packages offer you more money for more expensive colleges, so even a private college may not be an unreasonable choice. Contact the REAP counselor to look through reference books about all of the different colleges you could go to and learn about more resources to search for schools.
  • Use online resources such as the College Board College Search to search for colleges and Cappex college search made easy.
UC CSU
Visit schools when possible
  • The best way to get a feel for a college is to make a visit. If you have any friends in college, try to plan a trip to visit them. Talk to your family about checking out various California colleges, whenever possible.
  • Be prepared for your visit. Check out the College Board’s Campus Visit Checklist
Contact current university students
  • If you cannot visit a college campus, you can certainly get in touch with students and admissions counselors via email. Talk to the REAP counselor about how to locate university contacts.
  • Look through your facebook friends, gather email addresses of friends going away to college, and try to keep in touch with your university student friends. Ask many questions about their college experience to help you figure out if that school is right for you.
The college application process
Online Applications
Personal Statement Help
How to finance college
College Costs
How much does it cost to attend UC?
This chart represents costs for one year as a California resident undergraduate of a University of California school. These costs are offset by grants and scholarships by a significant number of students. Keep in mind that costs will vary depending on personal preferences and the specific institution you attend.
UCLiving on CampusLiving Off Campus
TOTAL $31,200$28,400
Tuition and fees$13,200 $13,200
Books and supplies $1,500$1,500
Health insurance allowance/ fee$1,160$1,160
Room and board $13,200 $9,500
Personal/transportation $2,140 $3,040
Learn more
How much does it cost to attend CSU?
This chart represents the cost for one year as a California resident undergraduate of a California State University campus. These costs are offset by grants and scholarships for a significant number of students. Keep in mind that costs will vary depending on personal preferences and the specific institution you attend.
CSULiving on CampusLiving Off Campus
TOTAL $22,578 $22,981
Tuition and fees$13,200 $13,200
Books and supplies $1,500$1,500
Room and board $10,607 $10,845
Personal/transportation $3,829 $3,994
Learn more
Types of financial aid
Financial aid usually comes in the form of a package consisting of a combination of the different types of aid available. This combination of aid depends on the availability of funds, your eligibility, the timeliness with which the application process is completed, and your year in school. Please review the following types of aid, and learn how to apply.

Grants and Scholarships
  • Grants and scholarships are sometimes referred to as “gift aid” because they do not have to be repaid.
  • Usually grants are awarded by need, and scholarships are awarded by both need and merit.
  • About two-thirds of all student financial aid come from the federal government and is based solely upon financial need, not grades or class rank. Other aid programs are funded by the state institutions and private organizations.
  • The REAP Incentive-Based Scholarship program provides scholarship funding to students.
  • There are many additional scholarship and grants available, and we encourage students to research and apply for as many scholarship and grant opportunities as possible.
  • Grant aid comes from federal and state governments and from individual colleges. The main way students receive grant aid is by filling out a FAFSA form . It is important to complete all applications and forms in a timely manner because grant aid is limited.
  • Most federal and state grants require that you are a US citizen or eligible non-citizen; registered with Selective Service (if required); and not have been convicted of drug possession or sales in the recent past (see FAFSA for more detail).
  • The amount of aid you will be rewarded depends on the timeliness of your application and your response to requests from the Financial Aid Office, your Expected Family Contribution, and any types of special ability you may demonstrate.
Learn more about grants and scholarships available to you
  • REAP Incentive-Based Scholarships–REAP eligible Lindsay High School students earn $250 for scores of 3.5 or 4.0 in REAP eligible classes. Students who earn $1000 or more in one year earn a $1,000 bonus for that year. The top five earners in each class are invited to apply for additional Super Scholarships that are much larger rewards aimed to get the student close to a full ride to the college of their choice.
  • The Cal Grant Program–With a Cal Grant you can get up to $12,192 a year to pay for college expenses at any qualifying California college, university or career or technical school in California. These are funds that do not have to be repaid. There are many different kinds of Cal Grants. There is money available for tuition, room and board, even books and supplies. You must submit a verified Cal Grant GPA by March 2nd. Some colleges may request additional documents such as tax returns.
  • Pell Grants–Pell grants are considered the foundation of federal financial aid, to which other aid can be added. Pell grants do not have to be repaid. They are federal grants based on need. The maximum Pell grant for the 2011-2012 school award year is $5,550. The amount awarded depends on your financial need, the cost of your school, and the timeliness with which you complete the application.
  • Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants –These are need-based grants to help low-income undergraduate students finance the costs of post secondary education. Students can receive these grants at any of approximately 3,800 participating post secondary institutions. When making FSEOG awards, the institution must give priority to those students with “exceptional need” (those with the lowest Expected Family Contributions, or EFCs, at the institution) and those who are also Federal Pell Grant recipients.
  • UC’s Blue and Gold Opportunity Plan–Under the Blue and Gold plan, your system-wide fees will be fully covered by scholarship or grant money if you are in your first four years at UC (or two if you are a transfer student). The plan looks at all the sources of scholarship and grants awards you have received (federal, state, UC, and private), and makes up the difference if they do not fully cover your fees. Students with greater financial need can qualify for even more UC grant support. In 2010-11, UC provided grant and scholarship assistance averaging $14,514 per student to more than half of undergraduates. You don’t need to fill out a separate application to qualify for the Blue and Gold Opportunity Plan. Simply file a FASFA and ensure that your CAl Grant GPA Verification has been submitted by the March 2 deadline of the year you plan to attend UC. You will receive the benefits of the Blue and Gold plan automatically if you qualify.
  • Regents Scholarships–Students with outstanding academic records and personal achievement are considered for Regents Scholarships, which is the UC’s most prestigious scholarship award. Regents Scholarships may be either honorary or need-based. Depending upon the campus, annual Regents Scholarship awards range from $1,000 honoraria to scholarships that cover full financial need for students who qualify for financial aid. Regents Scholarships are awarded to entering freshmen for up to four years.
  • State University Grant Program– provides need-based aid to eligible undergraduate and graduate students who are California residents. The priority is to award grants at least equal to the amount of the State University fee ($4,428 for undergraduates) who have an expected family contribution (EFC) of $4,000 of less, and who are not receiving a Cal Grant or other award designated to cover fees. Each campus has established local awarding policies and priorities for these funds.
  • Alumni Scholarships–Alumni associations at some campuses award scholarships to entering students who have demonstrated leadership, academic achievement and participation in extracurricular activities. Awards range from $300 to $15,000 and, at some campuses, are renewable annually for qualified candidates. You do not need to be a relative of an alumnus (a graduate of the University of California) to qualify for an Alumni Scholarship.
  • Restricted scholarships–Restricted scholarships are available only to students with specific backgrounds, academic interests, career objectives and other criteria. You apply for these when you apply for admission by checking off the characteristics that apply to you.
  • The Gold List— We highly encourage that you frequently check the Lindsay High School Gold List for scholarships listed by due date. It is very important that you pay close attention to these dates and apply to as many grants and scholarships as possible.
Search for additional scholarships
Loans
  • Over half of financial aid comes in the form of loans to students or parents that must be repaid. Student loans are subsidized by the government, so no interest accrues until you begin repayment after you graduate.
  • At CSU schools, over 56 percent of all undergraduates who receive financial aid typically take out a student loan. The average loan for 2009-10 was $7,485. A large percentage of UC students take out student loans as well.
  • Almost all students qualify for some form of student loan, but should consider the obligations associated with borrowing. It is likely that you will use a combination of funding options for college, but ideally, you will have scholarship money to offset the cost you will have to borrow.
Learn more about loan options
Federal Student Loans
  • Federal Plus Loans–The PLUS Loan Program is the largest source of parent loans. Parents can borrow up to the full cost of attendance minus any aid received their student receives Repayment starts 60 days after money is paid to college.
  • Perkins Loans–Perkins Loans are need-based loans, awarded to students with the highest need. The interest rate is very low (5%), and no payments are made until the student is out of college.
  • Subsidized Stafford or Direct Loans–Subsidized Stafford Loans are need-based loans with interest rates in the 4-6 percent range. The federal government “subsidizes” (or pays) the yearly interest while you are in school.
  • Unsubsidized Stafford or Direct Loans–Unsubsidized Stafford Loans are not based on financial need and can be used to help pay the family share of costs. For these loans you must pay the interest on the loan while in school.
  • Private student loans–A number of lenders and other financial institutions offer private education loans to students. These loans are not subsidized and usually carry a higher interest rate than the federal need-based loans.
  • College-sponsored loans–Some colleges have their own loan funds. Interest rates may be lower than federal student loans. Read the college’s financial aid information.
  • Other loans–Besides setting up scholarships, some private organizations and foundations have loan programs as well. Borrowing terms are often quite good.
Parent Loans
  • Federal PLUS Loans–The PLUS Loan program is the largest source of parent loans. Parents can borrow up to the full cost of attendance minus any aid received, and repayment starts 60 days after money is paid to the college.
  • Private parent loans–A number of lenders and other financial institutions offer private education loans for parents. These usually carry a higher interest rate than PLUS loans.
  • College-sponsored loans–A small number of colleges offer their own parent loans, usually at a better rate than PLUS loans. Check each college’s aid materials to see if these loans are available.
Work
  • Many students choose to work part-time to supplement financial aid while they are in college. The choice between working and possibly taking fewer classes and longer to graduate or borrowing money to focus on school and finish earlier is one every student must make.
  • Work-study is a federal program that provides students with part-time employment to help meet their financial needs and give the student work experience.
  • Student employment and work-study aid helps students pay for education costs such as living expenses and books and supplies.
Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)
  • To apply for federal, state, and college financial aid programs, you need to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
  • The FAFSA will determine the amount of money your family can afford to contribute to your college education. The Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is determined by “need calculators” using things household income, assets, and family size, and compare them proportionally with other families’ financial circumstances. The EFC assumes that families will meet their contribution through a combination of savings, current income, and borrowing.
  • Don’t rule out colleges with higher costs. Say your EFC is $5,000. A college with a total cost of $8,000 may give you $3,000 in financial aid. At a college with a total cost of $25,000, you’d be eligible for $20,000 in financial aid. You would be asked to contribute the same amount to both colleges.
  • To fill out the FAFSA, you will need records of the income your family earned in the year prior to when you will start school.
  • If you have a social security number, you will need it. If you do not have a social security number, please contact the REAP counselor to learn about new ways you can use FAFSA under the California Dream Act.
  • If you have a driver’s license, you will need the number when filling out FAFSA.
  • You will need your parent’s W-2 forms and other records of money earned such as their Federal Income Tax Return, IRS 1040, 1040A, 1040EZ, Foreign Tax Return, untaxed income statements, current bank statements, current business and investment mortgage information, business and farm records, stock, bond and other investment records.
  • If you are not a US citizen, you will need your alien registration or permanent registration card.
  • There are three ways to file the FAFSA: (1.) Log in and apply online (recommended) (2.) Complete a PDF FAFSA in English or Spanish (Note: PDF FAFSAs must be mailed for processing); or (3). Request a paper FAFSA by calling us at 1-800-4-FED-AID (1-800-433-3243) or 319-337-5665. If you are hearing impaired, please contact the TTY line at 1-800-730-8913.
  • You can begin filing the FAFSA on January 1st or as soon as you have your tax returns. It is VERY important that you fill out the FAFSA in a timely manner. There is only so much grant money available, and students who complete the paperwork first often get more funding.
Median earnings in 2008 for year-round workers 25 years old

Click to enlarge

Learn More, Earn More

  • Make sure you are university eligible by taking A-G requirements.
  • Review REAP eligible classes and add up potential earnings to begin your college savings plan now.