Parent Resources

The REAP Counselor
  • Encourage your student to use the REAP counselor as a resource to help stay on the college track and choose a career path and college that fits their interests.
  • The REAP counselor can help you learn what to do to support your student’s efforts to get into the college of their choice.
  • The REAP counselor can help you formulate a financial plan to access resources that will help you pay for college.
  • It is especially important that you get to know the REAP counselor during your student’s junior and senior year. She will need your help in making sure your student stays attentive to the many financial aid and college application deadlines. She would also like to help you and your student make a financial plan to finance college.
REAP Incentive-Based Scholarships
  • The REAP Incentive-Based Scholarship Program will award your student with $125 in college funding for scores of 3.5 or 4.0 for Part A, and another $125 for Part B, in English, math, science and foreign language classes. See a complete list of REAP eligible classes here.
  • Students in the graduating classes of 2013-2016 earn funding in this way in 9th through 12th grade, and have a total of $200,000 available to their class. Students in the graduating classes of 2017-2023 earn funding in this way in 7th through 12th grade and have a total of $250,000 available to their class.
  • Top REAP students are eligible to apply for Super Scholarships in their 12th grade year, which could potentially bring their total REAP rewards up to $45,000.
  • REAP students who do not earn a minimum of $2500 in REAP funds before they graduate will forfeit their earnings back into their class’s fund. Students are offered considerable support to meet the minimum, and we encourage you to talk to your student about what it will take to reach this minimum.
  • Students earn $500 for passing CAHSEE on their first attempt.
  • Every year a student earns more than $1,000 in REAP funds, they earn an additional bonus of $1,000. The earnings for passing CAHSEE are excluded from the minimum required to earn the bonus.
  • You should be receiving REAP earnings statements in the mail each semester that show how your student’s REAP college fund is growing. Closely examine this statement, and consider how you can encourage your student to earn more funds, or if already earning the maximum, to keep up the good work.
  • REAP earnings are only disbursed for four-year accredited universities. If a student attends a two-year university, their funds will be held until they transfer to a four-year university.
  • Students must maintain a life skills score of 4.0 in the class that qualifies them for funds to earn REAP funds.
  • Students must complete all measurement topics for the eligible course in one year to earn REAP funds.
  • Students are required to fulfill 20 mentoring hours per year once they have met the $2500 minimum required to keep their REAP funds. Contact Norma Murillo to learn about how to complete mentoring hours.
  • Parents are required to attend at least four meetings held throughout the school year. These meetings include, but are not limited to, Back to School Night, Parent University, Sophomore Counseling, ELAC and School Site Counseling. Contact Norma Murillo for more details.
  • If you attend the PIQE institute, you will only be required to attend one REAP meeting per year.
The Benefits of a College Degree

A college degree will ensure:

  • A Higher Salary – College graduates earn an average of $1 million more than high school graduates over their lifetime. Better-paying jobs require more education and skills that workers can only get in college. Without a college degree, many get stuck in jobs earning low wages.
  • Job Security-There are far more jobs available for people with college degrees than there are for people with only high school diplomas. The more education your student has, the more likely he or she will be to always have a good job.
  • Quality Job Opportunities-Today, most good jobs require a college education, much more so than in the past. Modern businesses increasingly want to hire people who have gone through college. A college degree will allow your student to be more selective in choosing the type of work he or she wants to do.
  • Open Doors– Perhaps most importantly, college gives your student the opportunity to meet other motivated, smart and success-oriented people, and the chance to be exposed to new opportunities, experiences, and creative ways of thinking that will help him or her be successful in both personal and work life.
  • Why should your student attend college directly after high school?- Many students who do not enter college directly after high school never get around to it. In fact, even a large percentage of high school graduates who begin their education at a two-year community college do not transfer to finish their four-year degree. Encourage your student to take advantage of the help the REAP Foundation is offering to navigate the pathway to college and make a financial aid plan to fund college.
What You Can Do
The Parent Institute for Quality Education
The Parent Institute for Quality Education (PIQE) shares the REAP goal of helping parents understand how to navigate the pathway to college. We encourage you to learn more about PIQE’s Parent Engagement Education Program, offered at Lindsay High School.

Learn More
The Parent Engagement Education Program is PIQE’s signature program. The program educates parents on how to foster a positive educational environment for their student at home and at school. It teaches parents about how colleges choose which students to admit, how to make sure your student is taking the necessary classes to prepare for college, how to navigate the school system, and other information vital to the academic success of your child. PIQE classes are taught in English and Spanish. Parents who complete this program guarantee their child a spot at one of the CSU campus if their child meets CSU eligibility requirements.

The program, which requires parents to attend meetings once a week for nine weeks, culminating with a parent graduation ceremony, is free to parents of students in the migrant program at Lindsay High School. We would like all REAP parents to be able to attend this valuable program for free. If you are interested in attending the PIQE workshop and your student is not in the migrant program, contact Norma Murillo.

Help Your Student Stay on the College Track
Help your student select the right classes
A-G Requirements
Most colleges require students to take all of the classes listed in the chart below. Many colleges prefer additional years of math, science, and foreign language. Please help your student make sure they are enrolling in classes that follow A-G requirements.

AreaSubjectYears
A.US History and Social Science2
B.English4
C.Mathematics (Algebra I, Geometry, and Intermediate Algebra)
3
D.Science with laboratory (1 year
Biological and 1 year Physical)
2
E.Language other than English
(the same language)
2
F.Visual and Performing Arts (Art, Dance, Theater/Drama, or Music)
1
G.An additional year chosen from the a-g list
1
Total Required Subject Units15
Encourage your student to take challenging classes
  • Your student needs to take at least five solid academic courses every semester. This will also provide him or her plenty of opportunities to earn REAP rewards.
  • The academic rigor of the courses your student takes is an important factor in the college admission process.
  • Advanced Placement (AP) credits help your student stand out in the admissions process. More competitive schools expect that students have taken many of AP classes that are offered. AP also gives your student the opportunity to earn college credit now, free of charge. Once your student attends a university, each credit will cost a significant amount of money. Encourage your student to advantage of the opportunity to save money and enter college ahead of the game.
  • If your student is having a hard time with the challenging classes to begin with, it is OK to start with the basics. Once your student builds proficiency in those courses, he or she can set goals to move on to advanced classes. Colleges like to see improvement, and applicants who continuously challenge themselves and grow.
  • Your student needs to take English every year.
  • Your student needs to take algebra and geometry to succeed on college entrance exams. You should encourage your student to take these courses as early on as possible.
  • Your student should enroll in advanced science and math to show colleges he or she is ready for higher-level work. Most colleges look for students who have taken at least three years of math in high school. More competitive colleges look for students who have taken four years of math.
  • Colleges want to see that you have taken at least three years of laboratory science classes. More competitive schools expect that you take four years of lab science classes.
  • Your student needs to take two semesters of US history, one semester of US government, one semester of either world history or geography, and an additional semester of social studies.
  • Many colleges require at least two years of foreign language, and many prefer more.
  • Many colleges recommend one or two semesters in the arts.
  • Contact REAP counselor Norma Murillo if you have more questions. She can be reached at (559) 562-5911, ext. 4016.
REAP eligible classes
  • See REAP eligible classes
  • Your student is eligible to earn $125 for Part A and another $125 for Part B in each REAP eligible class. If he or she earns $1,000 or more a year in this way, he or she will earn a $1,000 yearly bonus.
Help your student set high academic goals
  • Sit down with your student and make a list of which REAP eligible classes he or she plans to take, adding up total possible earnings. Help your student make a goal of how many of these classes he or she will be able to maintain at least a 3.5 in, and check in periodically on that goal.
  • You should be receiving academic progress reports from Lindsay High School by mail every six weeks. This is a good time to check in with your student about their REAP goals, and discuss whether or not they are on track to earn REAP funding as planned.
  • Encourage your student to consider many different career paths, and many different four-year universities. It is important that he or she seeks out information about the wide array of options available, and looks into education requirements of different careers and admissions requirements of different colleges.
  • After your student gathers information about different colleges, help him or her write a list of colleges of interest, as well as admissions requirements at each school. Encourage your student to talk to the REAP counselor about how to find out what GPA and SAT/ACT scores colleges on the list require for admittance.
Encourage your student to get involved in extracurricular activities
  • Encourage your student to find something he or she likes doing outside of class, and dive into it. Colleges want to see that students are following and actively pursuing their passions. Encourage your student to find a club, sport, extracurricular activity, volunteer opportunity, or job that will help show colleges that he or she has the ability to make a commitment to something and follow through with it.
  • Colleges are not necessarily looking for students who do everything. They are looking for students who make a commitment to an interest or passion outside of academics. Help your student think about depth rather than breadth.
  • Work experience can help your student identify career interests and goals, gain skills, and apply classroom knowledge to the real world. Encourage your student to look for a job in a field that interests them, even if they have to do a job that does not particularly interest them to begin with.
  • Encourage your student to shadow someone in the workforce in a field of interest. Contact the REAP counselor for more information on how to facilitate job-shadowing.
  • Volunteer work such as tutoring, mentoring or community service is a good way for your student to gain experience and show colleges that he or she care about the community.
Help your student follow the College Track Calendar
The following calendar explains what your student should be doing throughout the year beginning in middle school and continuing throughout high school to prepare for college. We encourage you to review this calendar regularly and check in with your student about his or her progress on the tasks it lists throughout the year.
Middle School
7th Grade
Fall

  • Take challenging classes, and strive for 3.5s and 4.0s. Take your middle school courses seriously. This is the time to begin forming habits that will keep you on the college track.

Winter

  • Think about your interests and skills.
  • Consider which classes were your best in your first semester of middle school. Consider which classes you could use improvement in.
  • Talk to your teacher and tell him or her that you are interested in going to college. Get help with classes you need improvement in.
  • Ask your teacher if there are any extra curricular activities you can participate in that will add to your interests and skills.
  • Review the earnings you received first semester. Discuss with your teacher and your family what you need to do to earn more funding next semester, or what you have been doing that has helped you succeed and begin building your college fund.

Spring

  • Check in again with your teacher. Have you done what you need to improve in classes that were giving you trouble? Have you found any ways to take your skills or interests further outside of school?
  • Discuss staying on the college track with your teacher.
  • Discuss the college track with your family.
  • Talk with your teacher and family about making an appointment to talk with the REAP counselor if you have any confusion about our program or what you need to be doing to stay on the college track.

Summer

  • Review your REAP earnings with your family. Discuss what you need to do next year to keep up the good work, or begin improving academic performance to earn more funding.
  • Find extracurricular activities to get involved in that have to do with your interests. Try to find opportunities to volunteer or offer community service.
  • Try to begin reading outside of school. This will not only help you in your classes and bring you lifelong enjoyment, but it will also help you to perform well on standardized tests.
8th Grade
Fall

  • Make a plan to keep good study habits and do well in all of our courses.
  • Aim for 3.5 and 4.0s in ALL of your core classes. This will not only earn you REAP funds, but it will prepare you for what you need to do in high school to be admitted into the college of your choice.
  • What you do now is setting the stage for how you will perform in high school. It is important that you do your best and take your classes seriously.
  • Use this year to find extracurricular activities to get involved in both inside and outside of school. It is important to try to become a community-minded person.

Winter

  • Check in with your teacher and your family about your academic performance first semester and review the REAP funds you have earned.
  • Discuss how you could have earned more REAP funds, or if you earned the maximum, discuss opportunities to take your skills and interests further.

Spring

  • Check in with your teacher about how you have been performing in class. Explain that you want to go to college, and seek out advice about how to form good study habits to keep on the college track.
  • Take advantage of your last opportunities as a middle school student to get involved in extracurricular activities. Join a club, find a cause, try to find organizations that match up with your interests.

Summer

  • Review your REAP earnings with your family. Discuss what you need to do next year to keep up the good work, or begin improving academic performance to earn more funding.
  • Find extracurricular activities to get involved in that have to do with your interests. Try to find opportunities to volunteer or offer community service.
  • Try to make a habit of reading outside of school. This will not only help you in your classes and bring you lifelong enjoyment, but it will also help you to perform well on standardized tests.
  • Discuss what sort of extracurricular activities, clubs, and or sports you would like to participate in next year with your friends and family.
  • Try to find current Lindsay High School students to talk to about what to expect in high school.
  • Look into A-G course requirements, and begin thinking about what types of courses you will need to take in high school to stay on the college track.
  • Look ahead into how much REAP funding you can earn over the next four years. Begin planning for college now.
High School
9th Grade
Aug

  • Meet with your counselor to discuss your college plans. Make sure you are taking challenging classes that will help you prepare for college. Colleges prefer four years of English, as well as history, math, science, and foreign language.
  • Get involved in extracurricular activities.

Sept

  • Make a list of your skills and interests by thinking hard about what you enjoy and what you are good at. Begin the career exploration brainstorming process.
  • Find out more about the fields that interest you, and what education is required to get a job in those fields, what kind of salary you will earn, what the working conditions will be like, what the future outlook is of careers in this field, etc.
  • Make a list of possible jobs that can be matched to your skills and interests.
  • Set your goals. Know what will be expected of you in high school to be admitted to a college that will help you attain your goals, and keep your eye on the prize.
  • Make a plan. What will you do if you feel yourself falling behind in your classes? What resources can you use to keep yourself on track? Talk to the REAP counselor to help formulate a plan to stay on track toward achieving your goals.

Oct

  • Browse college handbooks, guides, and websites, and begin making a list of colleges that interest you. Check out different majors and strengths of various universities. Note college admission requirements, and add them to the goals you have set for yourself.
  • Seek out more information about these colleges.

Nov

  • Check in with your teachers of core classes about how you are doing. Explain that you are a REAP student, and it is really important to you that you earn a 3.5 or 4.0 in their class. If you are not on-track to earn these scores, ask your teachers what you can do to improve your performance.
  • Find extracurricular activities to get involved in if you have not already.

Dec

  • Assess your study habits after your first semester of high school. Are they working? Do they need to be adjusted? If you are not earning 3.5s and 4.0s in your core classes schedule meetings with individual teachers and the REAP counselor to discuss what you need to do to improve your academic performance.

Jan

  • Review your REAP earnings after first semester. Discuss with your family and with the REAP counselor what you could have done to earn more funding, and make a plan to improve performance in the new semester.Check the goals you set first semester. Are you on track? If you have fallen behind, be proactive in scheduling meetings with your teachers and counselors to make a plan to get back on track.

Feb

  • Spend some more time reviewing college options, and expand your list of possible colleges. Talk to the REAP counselor about how to find out more about colleges that interest you.
  • Spend some more time reviewing potential careers. Look at your list of interests and skills. Is there anything you can add to it? Can you think of any extracurricular activities, clubs, or jobs that are related to this interest that you can participate in?

Mar

  • Find extracurricular activities to get involved in if you have not already. Talk to the REAP counselor if you cannot think of any.

April

  • Begin exploring financial aid websites and scholarships that are available. Review the applications they require, and begin getting an idea of what will be required of you when the time comes to apply for this aid.

May

  • Check in with your teachers in core classes about your performance. Ask if you are on track to receive a 3.5 or 4.0. If you are not on track, schedule a time with your teacher to formulate a plan about how you can improve your performance.

June

  • Review your REAP earnings with your family. Discuss what you need to do next year to keep up the good work, or begin improving academic performance to earn more funding.

July

  • Seek out community service opportunities and extracurricular activities to get involved in during the summer. Colleges are looking for applicants who stand out and show that they have pursued their interests and strengths outside of school. Look for a job related to a field that interests you, even if it is just sweeping their floors.
  • Try to make a habit of reading outside of school. This will not only help you in your classes and bring you lifelong enjoyment, but it will also help you to perform well on standardized tests.
10th grade
Aug

  • Review your schedule to make sure you are enrolled in challenging classes that will help you prepare for college.
  • Review your list of colleges with your LHS counselor and the REAP counselor. Talk with them about whether they think these colleges are the right fit, and whether you are on track to be admitted.
  • Spend some time looking through books listing all colleges, college websites, and software that helps match you to potential colleges to make sure you include a wide array of possibilities on your college list. Remember, many students get more aid for more expensive colleges, so cost is not always a factor.

Sept

  • Get involved in extracurricular activities if you have not already.

Oct

  • Sign up for the PSAT.
  • Begin PSAT test prep.
  • Take the PSAT.

Nov

  • Talk to your teachers about your performance in core classes, and make sure you are doing what is required to earn 3.5s and 4.0s. If you are falling off track, schedule a time with your teacher to make a plan to get caught up.

Dec

  • Revisit the goals you have set for yourself and assess whether or not you are on track. Are you meeting eligibility requirements of colleges on your list? If you have concerns or want to talk about your academic performance, schedule an appointment to meet with your REAP counselor.

Jan

  • Review your REAP earnings with your family and your teachers. Discuss how you can improve your performance to earn more funding, if necessary.
  • Calculate how much additional REAP funding you will be able to earn for the rest of the year and in total. Make sure you are taking enough challenging classes that are REAP eligible.
  • Learn the difference between grants, loans, work study, and colleges.
  • Review your REAP funds and estimate how much additional REAP funding you will earn throughout high school.
  • Make a plan of where you will get the additional funding necessary to pay for college. Review grants, scholarships and loans, and see what is required in the application process.

Feb

  • Join extracurricular activities if you have not already.

Mar

  • Review list of interests, and see if you need to add any interests or skills you have not yet listed.
  • Review list of colleges, and think deeply about how they match your interests and the way of life you would like to have during college. Make any necessary adjustments.

April

  • Make sure you are on track to earn 3.5s and 4.0s in core classes. Seek out help if you are not.

May

  • Seek out more information about colleges that interest you through their websites, resources listed here, and leads you get from the REAP counselor.
  • If you have the opportunity to visit a college, take it.

June

  • Review your REAP earnings with your family and your teachers. Discuss how you can improve your performance to earn more funding if necessary.

July

  • Try to make a habit of reading outside of school. This will not only help you in your classes and bring you lifelong enjoyment, but it will also help you to perform well on standardized tests.
  • Seek out community service opportunities and extracurricular activities to get involved in during the summer. Colleges are looking for applicants who stand out and show that they have pursued their interests and strengths outside of school. Look for a job related to a field that interests you, even if it is just sweeping their floors.
  • Review your scores in high school core classes so far. Think deeply about what you will need to do next year to improve or keep up the good scores. Junior year is considered the most important year to most colleges. You will need to take your classes seriously and do your best.
11th grade
Aug.

  • Your junior year is one of the most important years in the college preparation process. It is important to get good grades during your junior year, and begin finalizing the list of colleges you will apply to.
  • You need to put the test dates and registration deadlines for the PSAT, ACT, and SAT on your calendar, your parent’s calendars, and any additional calendars you can find.
  • Continue to take challenging courses, striving for 3.5s and 4.0s.

Sept.

  • Make a fresh list of your abilities, preferences, and personal qualities. List things you may want to study and do in college.
  • Read about colleges and majors.
  • Review financial aid options.
  • Create a more serious list of college interests, including 8-15 colleges that fit your interests and that you will be able to meet admittance requirements. Review this list with the REAP counselor, making sure it is based on facts.

Oct

  • Sign up for the PSAT.
  • Begin PSAT test prep.
  • Take the PSAT/NMSQT.
  • When taking the PSAT, sign up for Student Search Service (SSS) to get information about colleges and scholarship organizations and admissions and financial aid information. Colleges use SSS as a primary way to seek out students who are a good fit for their schools.
  • Formulate a study plan for the SAT and ACT.

Nov

  • If you haven’t already, sign up for the SAT and ACT.
  • Study for the SAT and/or ACT.

Dec

  • If you haven’t already, sign up for the SAT and ACT.
  • Study for the SAT and/or ACT.
  • Take the SAT and/or ACT (taking these tests multiple times each is recommended).

Jan

  • If you haven’t already, sign up for the SAT and ACT.
  • Study for the SAT and/or ACT.
  • Take the SAT and/or ACT (taking these tests multiple times each is recommended).

Feb

  • If you haven’t already, sign up for the SAT and ACT.
  • Study for the SAT and/or ACT.
  • Take the SAT and/or ACT (taking these tests multiple times each is recommended).

Mar

  • If you haven’t already, sign up for the SAT and ACT.
  • Study for the SAT and/or ACT.
  • Take the SAT and/or ACT (taking these tests multiple times each is recommended).
  • Search and apply for scholarships. Some deadlines are as early as the summer between 11th and 12th grade.

April

  • If you haven’t already, sign up for the SAT and ACT.
  • Study for the SAT and/or ACT.
  • Take the SAT and/or ACT (taking these tests multiple times each is recommended).
  • Search and apply for scholarships. Some deadlines are as early as the summer between 11th and 12th grade.

May

  • If you haven’t already, sign up for the SAT and ACT.
  • Study for the SAT and/or ACT.
  • Take the SAT and/or ACT (taking these tests multiple times each is recommended).
  • Search and apply for scholarships. Some deadlines are as early as the summer between 11th and 12th grade.
  • Write a resume– list your accomplishments, activities, and work experience.
  • Begin making a financial plan to fund college. Create a worksheet with costs and add up your funding options. Consult with the REAP counselor for help.
  • Update your information in FAFSA-4caster.ed.gov and compare the results to the actual costs of colleges to which you will apply.

June

  • Review your REAP earnings with your family and your teachers. Discuss how you can improve your performance to earn more funding if necessary.
  • Review your list of 8-15 colleges, and spend some time reviewing your GPA and test scores to the average GPA and test scores of the admitted classes from last year at each college. Make any changes necessary to your list of 8-15 colleges to make sure it contains colleges you will have a good chance at admission, some back-up colleges, and some long-shot colleges. You don’t need to remove the college of your dreams because your GPA is a little lower than their average, but you do need to make sure that you leave yourself plenty of options.

July

  • Try to visit schools that interest you this summer.
  • If you plan to play Division I or II college sports and want to be eligible to be recruited by colleges, register with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Eligibility Center.
  • If you took AP exams in May, look for your AP score report.
  • Register for fall test dates for the SATs.
  • Decide if you are going to apply under a particular’s school’s early action program.
  • Complete Scholarship Applications.
  • Try to make a habit of reading outside of school. This will not only help you in your classes and bring you lifelong enjoyment, but it will also help you to perform well on standardized tests.
  • Seek out community service opportunities and extracurricular activities to get involved in during the summer. Colleges are looking for applicants who stand out and show that they have pursued their interests and strengths outside of school. Look for a job related to a field that interests you, even if it is just sweeping their floors.
12th grade
Aug

  • Make a serious effort to gain as much information as possible about each of the colleges on your list. Try to visit if possible. If not, take a campus tour. Be in touch via email with admissions counselors and university students at each school. Keep a file of each college on your list.
  • Talk with your family about which of these 8-15 colleges is the best fit for you. Weigh the pros and cons of each school. Remember to stay true to your interests and aspirations, but also listen to advice from others.

Sept

  • Narrow your list of colleges to approximately 5-8, and review it with the REAP counselor. Get an application and financial aid information for each college.
  • Visit as many of these 5-8 colleges as possible.
  • Make a calendar for the college application process with admissions and financial aid deadlines.
  • Ask for letters of recommendation.
  • Visit with your counselor and make sure you fulfilling college admission requirements.
  • Complete Scholarship Applications.

Oct

  • Ask for letters of recommendation.
  • UC Application period opens for fall admission of next year.
  • Get transcripts sent to the schools you will be applying to.
  • Complete Scholarship Applications.

Nov

  • Submission period for UC applicants.
  • Apply to the colleges you have chosen.
  • Complete scholarship applications.

Dec

  • Complete any last scholarship applications.

Jan

  • Filing period for FAFSA and Cal Grant Verification Form opens (filing period is open through March 2nd).
  • Encourage your parents to file their tax returns early.
  • As soon as possible after January first, complete FAFSA along with other financial aid applications your school may require.
  • After you submit FAFSA, you should receive your student aid report (SAR) within three days to three weeks.
  • Complete any last scholarship applications.

Feb

  • It is a myth that courses in the spring semester of your senior year don’t matter for college because you have already been accepted or rejected. If your performance drops off substantially, your college can cancel an offer of admission.

March

  • 1-31 Notification of UC admission decisions.
  • 2 deadline for all terms to submit FAFSA and Cal Grant GPA verification form.

April

  • If you can, visit any colleges that have invited you to enroll.
  • Review your college acceptances and compare the colleges’ financial aid packages.
  • Contact a school’s financial aid office if you have questions about the aid that school has offered you. Gettign to know your financial aid staff early is a good idea.
  • Submit any required financial deposit.
  • Submit Statement of Intent to Register to the college you choose to attend.

May

  • 1- UC Deadline for admitted freshman to submit Statement of Intent to Register.

June

  • 1 deadline for admitted freshman to submit Statement of Intent to Register.

July

  • 1-31 UC submission period for applicants for winter/spring quarter.
  • 15 final official transcripts due at campus admissions office for all students admitted for fall.
If possible, visit colleges with your student
  • The best way for your student to get to know which college will be a good fit is to visit various colleges to get a feel for them. If you can, arrange to visit colleges on your student’s list and take a campus tour.
  • College trips can also be a great motivator for your student.
  • There are campuses located all over California, so campus visits can be easily incorporated into family trips.
Financing College
There are many funding options available to finance higher education. You can help your student understand the importance of applying for a wide array of grants and scholarships (funds that do not have to be repaid) available to them. You can encourage your student to strive to earn 3.5s and 4.0s in REAP eligible classes to grow their REAP fund. We encourage you to explore the different types of financial aid listed below.
Grants and Scholarships
  • Grants and scholarships are sometimes referred to as “gift aid” because they do not have to be repaid.
  • Usually grants are awarded by need, and scholarships are awarded by both need and merit.
  • About two-thirds of all student financial aid come from the federal government and is based solely upon financial need, not grades or class rank. Other aid programs are funded by the state, institutions, and private organizations.
  • The REAP Incentive-Based Scholarship program provides scholarship funding to students.
  • There are many additional scholarship and grants available, and we encourage students to research and apply for as many scholarship and grant opportunities as possible.
  • Grant aid comes from federal and state governments and from individual colleges, and it’s limited. The main way students receive grant aid is by filling out a FAFSA form Complete all applications and forms in a timely manner.
  • Most federal and state grants require that you are a US citizen or eligible non-citizen; registered with Selective Service (if required); and not have been convicted of drug possession or sales in the recent past (see FAFSA for more detail).
  • The amount of aid you will be rewarded depends on the timeliness of your application, and your response to requests from the Financial Aid Office, and any types of special ability you may demonstrate.
Learn more about grants and scholarships available to your child
  • REAP Incentive-Based Scholarships–REAP eligible Lindsay High School students earn $250 for scores of 3.5 or 4.0 in REAP eligible classes. Students who earn $1000 or more in one year earn a $1,000 bonus for that year. The top five earners in each class are invited to apply for additional Super Scholarships that are much larger rewards aimed to get the student close to a full ride to the college of their choice.
  • The Cal Grant Program–With a Cal Grant your student can get up to $12,192 a year to pay for college expenses at any qualifying California college, university or career or technical school in California. These are funds that do not have to be repaid. There are many different kinds of Cal Grants. There is money available for tuition, room and board, even books and supplies. You must submit a verified Cal Grant GPA by March 2nd. Some colleges may request additional documents such as tax returns.
  • Pell Grants–Pell grants are considered the foundation of federal financial aid, to which other aid can be added. Pell grants do not have to be repaid. They are federal grants based on need. The maximum Pell grant for the 2011-2012 school award year is $5,550. The amount awarded depends on your financial need, the cost of your school, and the timeliness with which you complete the application.
  • Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants –These are need-based grants to help low-income undergraduate students finance the costs of post secondary education. Students can receive these grants at any of approximately 3,800 participating post secondary institutions. When making FSEOG awards, the institution must give priority to those students with “exceptional need” (those with the lowest Expected Family Contributions, or EFCs, at the institution) and those who are also Federal Pell Grant recipients.
  • UC’s Blue and Gold Opportunity Plan–Under the Blue and Gold plan, your student’s system-wide fees will be fully covered by scholarship or grant money. The plan looks at all the sources of scholarship and grants awards your student has received (federal, state, UC, and private), and makes up the difference if the fees are not fully covered.. Students with greater financial need can qualify for even more UC grant support. In 2010-11, UC provided grant and scholarship assistance averaging $14,514 per student to more than half of undergraduates. You don’t need to fill out a separate application to qualify for the Blue and Gold Opportunity Plan. Simply file a FASFA and ensure that your CAl Grant GPA Verification has been submitted by the March 2 deadline of the year you plan to attend UC. You will receive the benefits of the Blue and Gold plan automatically if you qualify.
  • Regents Scholarships–Students with outstanding academic records and personal achievement are considered for Regents Scholarships, which is the UC’s most prestigious scholarship award. Regents Scholarships may be either honorary or need-based. Depending upon the campus, annual Regents Scholarship awards range from $1,000 honoraria to scholarships that cover full financial need for students who qualify for financial aid. Regents Scholarships are awarded to entering freshmen for up to four years.
  • State University Grant Program– provides need-based aid to eligible undergraduate and graduate students who are California residents. The priority is to award a SUG at least equal to the amount of the State University fee ($4,428 for undergraduates) who have an expected family contribution (EFC) of $4,000 of less, and who are not receiving a Cal Grant or other award designated to cover fees. Each campus has established local awarding policies and priorities for these funds.
  • Alumni Scholarships–Alumni associations at some campuses award scholarships to entering students who have demonstrated leadership, academic achievement and participation in extracurricular activities. Awards range from $300 to $15,000 and, at some campuses, are renewable annually for qualified candidates. Your student does not need to be a relative of an alumnus (a graduate of the University of California) to qualify for an Alumni Scholarship.
  • Restricted scholarships–Restricted scholarships are available only to students with specific backgrounds, academic interests, career objectives and other criteria. Your student can apply for these when he or she applies for admission by checking off the characteristics that apply to him or her.
  • The Gold List— We highly encourage that you frequently check the Lindsay High School “Gold List” for scholarships listed by due date. It is very important that you pay close attention to these dates and apply to as many grants and scholarships as possible.
Your student can search for additional scholarships using the following resources:
Loans
  • Over half of financial aid comes in the form of loans to students or parents that must be repaid.
  • Student loans are subsidized by the government, so no interest accrues until the student begins repayment after he or she graduates.
  • At CSU schools, over 56 percent of all undergraduates who receive financial aid typically take out a student loan. The average loan for 2009-10 was $7,485. A large percentage of UC students take out student loans as well.
  • Almost all students qualify for some form of student loan, but should consider the obligations associated with borrowing. It is likely that students will use a combination of funding options for college, but ideally, they will have scholarship money to offset the cost they will have to borrow.
Learn more about loan options:
Parent Loans
  • Federal PLUS Loans–The PLUS Loan program is the largest source of parent loans. Parents can borrow up to the full cost of attendance minus any aid received, and repayment starts 60 days after money is paid to the college.
  • Private parent loans–A number of lenders and other financial institutions offer private education loans for parents. These usually carry a higher interest rate than PLUS loans.
  • College-sponsored loans–A small number of colleges offer their own parent loans, usually at a better rate than PLUS loans. Check each college’s aid materials to see if these loans are available.
Federal Student Loans
  • Perkins Loans–Perkins Loans are need-based loans, awarded to students with the highest need. The interest rate is very low (5%), and no payments are made until the student is out of college.
  • Subsidized Stafford or Direct Loans–Subsidized Stafford Loans are need-based loans with interest rates in the 4-6 percent range. The federal government “subsidizes” (or pays) the yearly interest while you are in school.
  • Unsubsidized Stafford or Direct Loans–Unsubsidized Stafford Loans are not based on financial need and can be used to help pay the family share of costs. For these loans you must pay the interest on the loan while in school.
  • Private student loans–A number of lenders and other financial institutions offer private education loans to students. These loans are not subsidized and usually carry a higher interest rate than the federal need-based loans.
  • College-sponsored loans–Some colleges have their own loan funds. Interest rates may be lower than federal student loans. Read the college’s financial aid information.
  • Other loans–Besides setting up scholarships, some private organizations and foundations have loan programs as well. Borrowing terms are often quite good.
Work
  • Many students choose to work part-time to supplement financial aid while they are in college. The choice between working and possibly taking fewer classes and longer to graduate or borrowing money to focus on school and finish earlier is one every student must make.
  • Work-study is a federal program that provides students with part-time employment to help meet their financial needs and give the student work experience.
  • Student employment and work-study aid helps students pay for education costs such as living expenses and books and supplies.
Additional Resources

From left to right: Joel Hernandez, Rosa Ibarra, Norma Murillo, Hector Lemus, Santiago Tello

With the money I am receiving, I have a better chance of going to a college that will help me achieve my goals.

-Graciela Gutierrez, ’15